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Nebra Sky Disc Ceramic Tile Gold Bronze Wall Decor Ancient Prehistoric Art Mosaic Rustic Universe

Nebra Sky Disc Ceramic Tile Gold Bronze Wall Decor Ancient Prehistoric Art Mosaic Rustic Universe

Your Price: USD$48.00
In Stock.
Part Number:nebra

Beautiful rendition of the 3,600-year-old Nebra Sky Disc discovered in 1999 atop a prehistoric mound in Ziegelroda Forest, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.

I hand rolled this tile from high fire clay, dried it for several days and carved the design, then fired it for several long hours. I then glazed it with burnished gold, copper and bronze glazes and back in the kiln for another firing. The tile measures approximately 5 " in diameter by 3/16" thick (12.5 cm x 5mm). there is a hollowed out hole with a steel loop in the back of the tile so it can be hung. Can also be put on a small easel to add decor to a table, living space or used as a centrepiece in a mosaic tiling project.

**Unique creation only one exists. The tile is hand cut and will vary in overall thickness and size since I do not use moulds. 
You will receive what is pictured. Colour may vary from PC monitor to smartphone screen.**

Nebra Sky Disc

The Nebra Sky Disc is a 3,600-year-old bronze disc which, according to UNESCO, features "the oldest concrete depiction of cosmic phenomena worldwide." 

Discovered in 1999 atop a prehistoric mound in Ziegelroda Forest, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany along with two precious swords, two axes, two spiral arm-rings and one bronze chisel. The enclosure was oriented in such a way that the sun seemed to set every solstice behind the Brocken, the highest peak of the Harz Mountains, some 80 km to the north-west. The surrounding area is known to have been settled since the Neolithic, and Ziegelroda Forest is said to contain around 1,000 barrows.

The Nebra bronze sky disc measures approximately 30 cm in diameter, weighs 2.2 kg, and is decorated with a blue-green patina and inlaid with gold symbols. These are interpreted generally as a sun or full moon, a lunar crescent, and stars (including a cluster interpreted as the Pleiades).

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