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Petroglyph Necklace Ancient Pendant Ceramic Teal Peterborough Stone Art

Petroglyph Necklace Ancient Pendant Ceramic Teal Peterborough Stone Art

Your Price: USD$24.00
In Stock.
Part Number:petro6
 Beautiful rendition of an ancient stone carving petroglyph (rock drawing) from the Peterborough petroglyphs in Ontario, Canada, created in high fire clay.

I formed this clay pendant, carved the ancient petroglyph then fired it for several hours in the kiln. I then glazed the pendant and back again in the kiln for another long firing.

Threaded onto an adjustable 1mm black Hemp cord. The pendant measures 1-3/8" long by 1" wide by 3/16" thick ( 35mm x 25mm x 4mm) and is topped with a tiny stainless steel ring.
**Only one model has been made, unique creation, what you see in the photo is what you will receive. Colour will vary in intensity from PC monitor to smartphone screen.**

Peterborough Petroglyphs:

The Peterborough Petroglyphs are the largest collection of ancient rock carvings (petroglyphs) in all of North America, made up of over 900 images carved into crystalline limestone located near Peterborough in Ontario, Canada.

Proclaimed a National Historic Site of Canada in 1976, local indigenous people believe that this is an entrance into the spirit world and that the Spirits actually speak to them from this location. They call it Kinoomaagewaapkong, which translates to "the rocks that teach". 
The petroglyphs are carved into a single slab of crystalline limestone which is 55 metres long and 30 metres wide. About 300 of the images are decipherable shapes, including humans, shamans, animals, solar symbols, geometric shapes and boats.

It is generally believed that the indigenous Algonkian people carved the petroglyphs between 900 and 1400 AD. But rock art is usually impossible to date accurately for lack of any carbon material and dating artefacts or relics found in proximity to the site only reveals information about the last people to be there. They could be thousands of years older than experts allow, if only because the extensive weathering of some of the glyphs implies more than 1,000 years of exposure.

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